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Roots of Contemporary Issues (Hist 105/305) Research

This page provides links to short videos demonstrating databases required for the Roots of Contemporary Issues research assignment

Chicago Style Citation Quick Guide

Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide - 17th Edition - Notes and Bibliography


 

Books

One author

Bibliography Entry (at end of paper)

Pollan, Michael. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.

Full Footnote (first citation in the paper)

1. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006), 99–100.

Abbreviated Footnote (second and subsequent citations in the paper)

2. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.

 

Two or three authors

Bibliography Entry

Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945. New York: Knopf, 2007.

Full Footnote

1. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007), 52.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Ward and Burns, War, 59–61.

 

Four or more authors, list all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. (“and others”):

Full Footnote

1. Dana Barnes et al., Plastics: Essays on American Corporate Ascendance in the 1960s . . .

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Barnes et al., Plastics . . .

 

Chapter or other part of a book (reference book entries)

Bibliography Entry

Morris, Jake. “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War.” In Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, edited by John D. Kelly, Beatrice Jauregui, Sean T. Mitchell, and Jeremy Walton, 67–83. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Full Footnote

1. Jake Morris, “Seeing Red: Mao Fetishism, Pax Americana, and the Moral Economy of War,” in Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, ed. John D. Kelly et al. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 77.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Morris, “Seeing Red,” 81–82.

 

 

Book published electronically

If a book is available in more than one format, cite the version you consulted. For books consulted online, list a URL or the name of the database. If no fixed page numbers are available, you can include a section title or a chapter or other number.

Bibliography Entry

Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. The Founders’ Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987. http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

OR

Kurland, Philip B., and Ralph Lerner, eds. The Founders’ Constitution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987. ProQuest Ebrary.

Full Footnote

1. Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner, eds., The Founders’ Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/.

OR

1. Philip B. Kurland and Ralph Lerner, eds., The Founders’ Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), ProQuest Ebrary.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Kurland and Lerner, Founder’s Constitution, chap. 10, doc. 19.


 

Articles

Article in a print journal

In a note, list the specific page numbers consulted, if any. In the bibliography, list the page range for the whole article.

Bibliography

Weinstein, Joshua I. “The Market in Plato’s Republic.” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 439–58.

Full Footnote

1. Joshua I. Weinstein, “The Market in Plato’s Republic,” Classical Philology 104 (2009): 440.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Weinstein, “Plato’s Republic,” 452–53.

 

Article in an online journal

Include a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) if the journal lists one. A DOI is a permanent ID that, when appended to https://doi.org/ in the address bar of an Internet browser, will lead to the source. If no DOI is available, list a URL, or include the name of the database (e.g., JSTOR) at the end of the citation as a substitute for a DOI or URL.

Bibliography

Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network.” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. https://doi.org/10.1086/599247.

OR

Kossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network.” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. JSTOR.

Full Footnote

1. Gueorgi Kossinets and Duncan J. Watts, “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network,” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 422, https://doi.org/10.1086/599247.

OR

1. Gueorgi Kossinets and Duncan J. Watts, “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network,” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 422, JSTOR.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Kossinets and Watts, “Origins of Homophily,” 439.

 

Newspaper or popular magazine articles

If you consulted the article online, include a URL or the name of the database. Page numbers, if any, can be cited in a note but are omitted from the bibliography entry.  If no author is identified, begin the citation with the article title.

Bibliography

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, and Robert Pear. “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote.” New York Times, February 27, 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.

OR

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay, and Robert Pear. “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote.” New York Times, February 27, 2010. ProQuest Newsstream.

Full Footnote

1. Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Robert Pear, “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote,” New York Times, February 27, 2010, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.

OR

1. Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Robert Pear, “Wary Centrists Posing Challenge in Health Care Vote,” New York Times, February 27, 2010, ProQuest Newsstream.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. Stolberg and Pear, “Wary Centrists.”


 

Website

It is often sufficient simply to describe web pages and other website content in the text (“As of May 1, 2017, Yale’s home page listed . . .”). For a source that does not list a date of publication or revision, include an access date.

Bibliography

McDonald’s Corporation. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts.” Last modified March 11, 2008. http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

Full Footnote

1. “McDonald’s Happy Meal Toy Safety Facts,” McDonald’s Corporation, last modified March 11, 2008, http://www.mcdonalds.com/corp/about/factsheets.html.

Abbreviated Footnote

2. “Toy Safety Facts.”

 

(All of these examples taken from the Chicago Manual of Style Quick Guide at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide/citation-guide-1.html, consult the guide for more examples)

 

 

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