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Key Databases

Below are the most useful databases to explore the richness of the journal literature in Architecture.

Good Read

Gallagher, L. (2013). The end of the suburbs: Where the American dream is moving. New York: Portfolio.Penguin.

"For nearly 70 years, the suburbs were as American as apple pie. As the middle class ballooned and single-family homes and cars became more affordable, we flocked to pre-fabricated communities in the suburbs, a place where open air and solitude offered a retreat from our dense, polluted cities. Before long, success became synonymous with a private home in a bedroom community complete with a yard, a two-car garage and a commute to the office, and subdivisions quickly blanketed our landscape. But in recent years things have started to change. An epic housing crisis revealed existing problems with this unique pattern of development, while the steady pull of long-simmering economic, societal and demographic forces has culminated in a Perfect Storm that has led to a profound shift in the way we desire to live. In The End of the Suburbs journalist Leigh Gallagher traces the rise and fall of American suburbia from the stately railroad suburbs that sprung up outside American cities in the 19th and early 20th centuries to current-day sprawling exurbs where residents spend as much as four hours each day commuting. Along the way she shows why suburbia was unsustainable from the start and explores the hundreds of new, alternative communities that are springing up around the country and promise to reshape our way of life for the better. Not all suburbs are going to vanish, of course, but Gallagher's research and reporting show the trends are undeniable. Consider some of the forces at work: The nuclear family is no more: Our marriage and birth rates are steadily declining, while the single-person households are on the rise. Thus, the good schools and family-friendly lifestyle the suburbs promised are increasingly unnecessary. We want out of our cars: As the price of oil continues to rise, the hours long commutes forced on us by sprawl have become unaffordable for many. Meanwhile, today's younger generation has expressed a perplexing indifference toward cars and driving. Both shifts have fueled demand for denser, pedestrian-friendly communities. Cities are booming. Once abandoned by the wealthy, cities are experiencing a renaissance, especially among younger generations and families with young children. At the same time, suburbs across the country have had to confront never-before-seen rates of poverty and crime. Blending powerful data with vivid on the ground reporting, Gallagher introduces us to a fascinating cast of characters, including the charismatic leader of the anti-sprawl movement; a mild-mannered Minnesotan who quit his job to convince the world that the suburbs are a financial Ponzi scheme; and the disaffected residents of suburbia, like the teacher whose punishing commute entailed leaving home at 4 a.m. and sleeping under her desk in her classroom. Along the way, she explains why understanding the shifts taking place is imperative to any discussion about the future of our housing landscape and of our society itself--and why that future will bring us stronger, healthier, happier and more diverse communities for everyone."--Publisher's website. 

New Libraries' Interface

The WSU LIbraries new discovery platform, Search It is now available. Shared with the other 38 members of the ORBIS Cascade Alliance (our Summit partners), Search It promises to provide students and faculty with more resources easily, resulting in more efficient research and better results.  Have a look at this new resource and let us know what you think!

Find a link to Search It's simple search box here:  Search It Simple Search

To get to Search It's advanced search, click on the button next to the simple search box.  The advanced search contains additional boxes and pull down menus that allow ways (scope, field, material type, language, and publication) for searchers to limit searches. 

Containing many article collections and databases that may or may be useful in a particular search, Search It may be used as an article-level discovery tool (Articles, Books, and More or Everything + (beta)). However, searching Search It should never be viewed as a substitute for the databases identified in this guide as key resources. When using this resource, users should pay particular attention to the limiting options available down the left-hand sidebar of each search results screen where the results may be refined by Library, Type, Author/Creator, Collection, Subject, Publication Date, or Journal Title. These options help users explore the many types of items available through Search It.  

More Discovery Interface Options: Google Scholar and WorldCat

Two more discovery search options to try are Google Scholar, a Google search for library materials, and WorldCat, a worldwide database of library cataloging records that is particularly strong in identifying works and collections on obscure topics housed throughout the world. 

Find a link to Google Scholar here:   Google Scholar

Find a link to WorldCat here:  WorldCat

When using both of these search engines, it is important to remember that Summit and interlibrary loans of materials not owned by WSU Libraries is absolutely free for students, faculty and staff.  When using Google Scholar from one's own device or laptop, it is important to configure the "Library Links" in the "Scholar Settings" to include Washington State University so that Google Scholar can access WSU's paid content. As of July 2014, WorldCat may or may not be tied to WSU's holdings.  If the version that you're using does not list WSU holdings, the holdings will be listed by zip code. 

When in doubt, go ahead and fill out an interlibrary loan request for those needed items that  WSU does not have so that the Libraries' can get these to you as soon as possible. 

Find a link to the Libraries' generic Interlibrary Loan page here:  Interlibrary Loans

Guides to Doing Research in Architecture

Groat, L. N., & Wang, D. (2013). Architectural research methods New York: J. Wiley.  (eBook)

Groat, L. N., & Wang, D. (2002). Architectural research methods. New York: J. Wiley.  (print)  Owen Science Library Reference   Call number:  NA2000 .G76 2002

Augustin, S., & Coleman, C. (2011). The designer's guide to doing research: Applying knowledge to inform design. Hoboken, N.J: John Wiley & Sons. (eBook)

Augustin, S., & Coleman, C. (2012). The designer's guide to doing research:  Applying knowledge to inform design.  Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons. (print) Holland and Terrell Libraries Stacks  Call number:   NA2750 .A94 2012 

 

NEW!!! Kanopy Video-Streaming Offers Content for Instruction, Research, and Pleasure Viewing

Continuing for Fall Semester 2017!

The Libraries has licensed a new educational video streaming service, Kanopy, that offers thousands of documentaries, training films, and theatrical releases.

Click http://wsu.kanopystreaming.com to get started!

At the very top of the Kanopy homepage, notice the "subjects' pull-down list next to the orange "Kanopy" logo.  If you choose "Arts," the design disciplines line up right there for your perusal.  

In this more scholarly alternative to Netflix or Amazon Prime, this content is ready for showing in a class, for using in a project, or for just plain viewing.  Do be aware that the software does anonymously keep track of the productions of interest to the WSU audience so that Libraries can purchase viewing rights to the most-watched films.  Certainly, if you decide to plan on showing a production in class regularly, please let me know so that we can work on Kanopy's continued funding. 

 

Welcome!

I hope that this libguide is helpful and I welcome suggestions for its improvement. 

The Architecture Library was moved from Carpenter Hall in the summer of 2012 to the second floor of the Owen Science Library.  The Owen Science Library is located close to Carpenter Hall--about 300 feet east of Carpenter Hall on College Street.  

The Owen Science Library hours are:

Mon - Thurs 7:30am -- 8:45am

Friday  7:30am -- 5;45pm

Saturday  1:00pm --5:45pm

Sunday  noon -- 8:45pm

As the Architecture subject liaison, I am available by email or in person for class presentations or student research consultations.   Feel free to contact me any time.  My contact information is below.    

 

 

 

Subject Profile

Christy Zlatos's picture
Christy Zlatos
Contact:
Terrell Library, Room 120L
(509) 335-4536

Outdoor Sculpture, Millennium Park, Chicago

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c1/Cloud_Gate_%28The_Bean%29_from_east%27.jpg

Cloud Gate (the Bean), by Anish Kapoor. Stainless steel highly polished to resemble mercury.

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons. 

Librarian Song

WSU Libraries, PO Box 645610, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164-5610, 509-335-9671, Contact Us